The Lord of the Rings
The Lord of the Rings

 

Cath as  Galadriel (40 kbytes) - Click to enlarge

Cath as Galadriel



Gollum (28 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Gollum



Legolas (93 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Legolas



Dwarf (105 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Dwarf



Palle as  Aragorn (13 kbytes)  - Click to enlarge
Palle as Aragorn



Natalia as  Arwen (27 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Natalia as Arwen



Ian Clarke as  Bilbo (31 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Ian Clarke as Bilbo



john private as  Blue Creature (133 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
john private as Blue Creature



john private as  Blue Creature (132 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
john private as Blue Creature



Elrond (10 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Elrond



David as  Frodo (94 kbytes)  - Click to enlarge
David as Frodo



Mark as  Gandalf (44 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Mark as Gandalf



Brian as  Saruman (47 kbytes)  - Click to enlarge
Brian as Saruman



Gimli (9 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Gimli



Gareth as  Boromir (14 kbytes)  - Click to enlarge
Gareth as Boromir



Sam McKeown as  Legolas (38 kbytes)  - Click to enlarge
Sam McKeown as Legolas



Orc (46 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Orc



Keith as  Innkeeper (28 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Keith as Innkeeper



Ivy as  Portrait (99 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Ivy as Portrait



JDave as  Dwarf (32 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
JDave as Dwarf



Lord of the Rings
Peter Jackson's famous cinematic trilogy ('Fellowship of the Ring' (2001), 'The Two Towers'(2002), 'The Return Of The King' (2003)) based around Tolkien's 'Lord of the Rings' has been a great box office hit around the world. It is inevitably different in feel from the novel as it is aimed very obviously at a mass audience and so overenthusiastically varies between near silence and very high sound levels - making it seem a bit like the 'Old Spice' advert from decades ago accompanied by Carl Orff's 'O Fortunao' from 'Carmina Burana'.

The BBC 13 part radio dramatisation from the 1980s with a very strong cast headed up by Robert Stephens, Michael Hordern, Ian Holm, John Le Mesurier,  had much better granularity of feel and inevitably by being radio left much to the listener's imagination - rather than being the so 'in the face' experience that the films are.

Ralph Bakshi's 1978 animated version probably comes somewhere between the two. Excellent in places but coming to an unexpected end apparently because of funding difficulties. Tolkien himself, who died in 1973,  probably would not have liked any of these. However, most people like the Jackson films and so there have been quite a few volunteers to be superimposed.
 

Links






21st Century Renaissance Home Page Help - Navigation